Apple Crisp to Go

Last weekend was the time for taking down the Christmas decorations.  We did it on Saturday, January 5, which by some reckonings is Twelfth Night. (Others put Twelfth Night on January 6. We don’t have strong feelings about this and are willing to keep an open mind.)

It always makes me a little sad to take down the decorations and to put the tree away. I miss the the ornaments—some fanciful, some homespun, some lovely—and the soft glow of the lights.  Here they are, all packed away. Farewell, my sweets, until next December.

But I really didn’t have time to brood because after the decorations were put away, it was on to the next project—apple crisp, which we brought to our friends Judy and Paul.

We took it hot out of the oven, hence the towel and pan, and at Judy and Paul’s house, the crisp was still warm enough to melt ice cream when it was served. Somehow, apple crisp is such a cozy, satisfying dessert in the winter. Best of all, I am able to get local apples at a nearby orchard well into winter, and I plan on making quite a few apple crisps for friends between now and spring.

At Judy and Paul’s, we talked of many things—politics, American history, and the moral failings of our founding fathers, who pieced together a country but blighted it with slavery. Unfortunately, the ugly repercussions are still being felt today, over 200 years later.

Paul noted that our founding fathers—John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin—did the best that they could. But did they? What would have happened if slavery had not been permitted? No country? Quite likely, but things fell apart less than a hundred years later, with the Civil War. Even afterwards, so many people continued to suffer because of the color of their skin. And still do.

Heavy topics for a January day. Good thing we had apple crisp, ice cream, and tea to lighten the mood.

When we came home from Judy and Paul’s, Clif made some of his delectable homemade French Fries, and we had them with faux chicken nuggets, which are tastier than you might think. Alas, no pictures. I’ll do better next time.

Then we settled down to watch Trevor Nunn’s delightful production of Twelfth Night, filmed in Cornwall and starring, among others, Ben Kingsley and Helena Bonham Carter. We own the DVD and watch it yearly. I think you can guess on which night. A bit of trivia: In Nunn’s Twelfth Night, Kingsley plays the jester, Feste, and I based my own Feste, in Maya and the Book of Everything, on Kingsley’s performance.

Might as well borrow from the best.

 

 

29 thoughts on “Apple Crisp to Go”

  1. That apple crisp looks absolutely delicious…and just right for a winter’s day. I’ll look out for the Twelth Night DVD .. it looks great. I know what you mean about the Christmas decorations.. sad to see them packed away..🙁

  2. The apple crisp looks yummy Laurie! Lovely to hear where your inspiration for Feste came from. I really liked his character in Maya and was very sad we lost him so soon – why did he have to go?💗🕊

    1. Thanks, Xenia. Just bought a big bag of local apples so that I have plenty on hand for apple crisp. As for Feste…if Feste had lived, Maya would have never gone to the Great Library on her own.

  3. What a line-up of stars in that Twelfth Night! I’m glad you had some compensations for putting away the decorations–and even gladder that your post showed up in my reader!

  4. You record the passing of time and the transition of days from one focus to another in a delightful way. The discussion you had with Judy and Paul is so important. History does repeat itself and it is only by understanding history and the evolution of culture and politics that we can hope to build a better world.

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