This Last Day of July

Yesterday, it was so hot and humid that I barely had the energy to move from my desk to the kitchen to make a vinaigrette for our supper salad much less dust the bedroom. But I did indeed accomplish both tasks. My reward? A lemon popsicle and time on the patio—where it was a little cooler—reading Village School by Miss Read, aka Dora Saint. (Read was a family name.)

Each year, as an end-of-summer treat, I reread the Chronicles of Fairacre, an “omnibus edition, comprising Village School, Village Diary, and Storm in the Village.” Even though I look calm, I am a jittery person, and Miss Read has a way of calming my jitters. All three novels follow the main character, also named Miss Read, who teaches in a village school in the Cotswolds. The books are not great literature—does all literature have to be great to be appreciated?—but Miss Read’s love of the natural world, her shrewd yet sympathetic take on human nature, and her humor never fail to delight me. Dora Saint has won praise from both the New Yorker and the New York Times, and with them I shall let the matter of her reputation rest.

Next to the patio, the bee balm has been knocked akimbo by the driving rains we have had each afternoon this week. Last Saturday, when our friends Paul and Judy came over for cocktails, the bee balm stood tall and proud. Now it looks as though a large, heavy ball landed in the middle of the patch. Such is the force of the rain. But the bees don’t care—straight or akimbo, the bee balm is irresistible to them.

The bee balm, knocked by the rain
The bee balm, knocked by the rain

While I read, I took many breaks to watch the goings-on in the yard. Next to me, a daddy longlegs skittered along the  phlox, still in bud. Birds called as they flew from the trees to the feeders, and occasionally,  a large dragonfly would zip by.

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Last night, the weather broke, and today is fine and hot with a bright blue sky. A good drying day, as my  mother would have said, and I have two loads of laundry ready to be hung on the line.

With this last day of July, which will have a second full moon this month—a blue moon—we are officially two-thirds of the way through summer in Maine. I love August and the hot, dry weather it often brings along with the loud buzzing of grasshoppers. I love the black-eyed Susans, the Queen Anne’s lace, and the golden rod in the fields. But August is also a sweet, sad month, the last month with nights warm enough to sit without a jacket on the patio.

To borrow from my friend Burni, who squeezes more joy out of an ordinary day than most people manage in a whole month, I will squeeze every bit of delight out of the golden month of August.

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14 thoughts on “This Last Day of July”

    1. Thanks, Jason! I’m sure you need to rest after the garden tour. I’d probably have to rest for a week 😉

  1. Here in southern Virginia August can be brutally hot and humid. But it is a beautiful month in its own way. I love your last line. I too will try to squeeze every bit of delight out of this month. 🙂

    1. Yes, I am sure it is very humid in southern Virginia in August. Traditionally, in Maine, August is a hot, dry month, one of the loveliest of the year. Oh, August!

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