August, Stay Awhile

The crickets have begun to sing. Their sweet trilling songs signal the arrival of late summer, a beautiful time in Maine. And this year, despite the climate crisis, August in Maine is everything it ought to be. The days are warm and dry. The nights are cool. We have a little rain now and then. Such a lovely, lovely month, and I wish I could stop it from speeding by. August, stay awhile. Don’t hurry on.

By August, the gardens are usually starting to look a little tattered, but this year they still look pretty good. Perhaps it’s because we had such a cool, rainy spring, and everything got a late start.

However, the slugs and snails have been nibbling on the hostas.

Still, they don’t look too bad. Sometimes by this time of year the hosta leaves look like green lace.

For the first time, I planted nasturtiums in the patio garden, and they are thriving. Actually, that’s putting it mildly. It looks as though theΒ  nasturtiums are ready to engulf the patio, and woe to those sitting on that side of the table. Feed me, Seymour!

This week the first Black-eyed Susan opened, and there are many more to come.

As is noted on the Better Homes & Gardens website, “Since black-eyed Susan blooms when other summer perennials begin to fade, this plant is a true sign that fall is near.”Β  Even though I love fall, black-eyed Susans are another reason to cherish August.

Various daylilies are still blooming. While they don’t thrive in my shady yard, they do add welcome bursts of color.

This weekend, we will be going to two plays. We will be having a friend over for nibbles and tidbits.

We will hold August close and be outside as much as possible.

39 thoughts on “August, Stay Awhile”

  1. August. We can’t wait for it to be over. The end of August means the threat of hurricanes begins to ease, as do the temperatures. None of us look as fresh as your flowers, but we cope. Every time I begin grousing to myself about having to work in the heat, I remind myself that I’m not involved in road construction or roofing, and I feel better.

    I’d feel wonderful on your patio, especially with those lilies and nasturtiums. I’ve never been the biggest fan of day lilies, but their color is bright and cheerful, and seems suited for perfect summer days.

  2. A lovely ode to August, a somewhat bittersweet month, as it feels like the last of the summer warmth. However, with CC, Sept. has about 2 wks of August in it, so I enjoy that as well.
    Enjoy your weekend!

  3. August so far has till been a little over heated for my liking but we had some rain last night and things feel fresher this morning. I can’t remember the last time I slept soundly through the night – no air conditioning here, only shutters and thick stone walls to rely on.
    Have a great weekend!

  4. I agree with Judy… hold August close … when you have a beautiful uplifting season it has to be cherished. My special month would be November…. everything is in bloom & the very hot weather has not yet arrived..πŸ‘πŸ‘Œ

    1. Yes, different months for different places. In Maine, November is rather bleak, but I do enjoy its stark beauty. Anyway, wish we could spread August out over several more months. In northern New England, August is one of the sweetest months.

    1. The ones I planted in the front could certainly be described as feeble. But the back ones—wowsah! In fact, everything in the back is growing like crazy. A very good year for the back gardens.

  5. Lovely! And I had totally forgotten that rudbekias and black-eyed Susans are one and the same. Ours are just opening too but here August has turned windy and extremely damp. I’m sure there will be a few more sunny days to come and with fresher cooler temperatures too.

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