A New Way to Look at the Fourth

It was another scorcher of a Fourth with temps in the 90s in the shade, and the humidity was high, too. Fortunately, the week before the Fourth was cool, which meant preparing for our annual  get-together was not as arduous as it has been in past years. (On Facebook last year, I wrote that July 3 was so hot that I felt like one of Dali’s melting clocks, which by the way I have seen at MOMA. The picture was much smaller than I had expected. Life is often like that, isn’t it?)

The heat did have one good effect—it kept the mosquitoes down so that we were able to gather on our patio rather than in our dining room. Here is a picture of the table filled with good food made by my friends and me.  A tip of the hat from Diane.

And because of the heat, we had plenty to drink, kept cold in ice.

On the Fourth, it is customary to honor the past and the hard work of those who came before us. At our gathering this year, we did something different. Instead, we praised the younger generation for their grit, courage, and levelheadedness. We have left a terrible mess for them to deal with, and it makes my heart ache to think about it. While every generation has its slackers—ours certainly did, too—so far I am encouraged by the upcoming generations that are rejecting cars, McMansions, and food chains such as Applebee’s. (Let’s face it. The food is terrible and overpriced at Applebee’s.)

Therefore, let the bells ring for the younger folks, the promise of a better future. And know that in this corner of Maine, in the woods, Clif and I will be living as lightly as we can to “be the change we wish to see.”

We will also vote, of course. That almost goes without saying. And in September of this year, Clif and I will join the youth in their Global Climate Strike.

Onward, ho, and creaky knees be damned!

 

 

 

 

31 thoughts on “A New Way to Look at the Fourth”

  1. We’ve got similar temperatures here at the moment and I don’t like going outside in it much. Neither do the dogs, so that’s lucky. We occasionally troop outside to get some washing in off the line, water the plants or have a wee but that’s about it. (the last being the dogs, not me 🤣)
    Looks like you had a great day.

  2. One of the nice things about these big holidays is that we get generations of people together, so they can learn from and encourage each other. We had a range here from 3 to 71. I think your point about the mess we’re leaving to the next generations is an important one . . .

  3. What a great looking spread! I made a tuna pasta salad for the Fourth for a post parade picnic–and will be making it again. One of the things about summer gatherings is I always make a new cold salad. And I’m with you on the younger generation. The ones I work with are amazing and smart and have their heads screwed on right.

    1. Salads are perfect this time of year. As for the younger generation…so true and I particularly hate the way my generation puts them down, especially after the mess we’ve made of things.

  4. I agree with Kerry about the benefits of multi-generational gatherings on days like this but I’m particularly struck by your decision to honour the young this year. We all need to be looking forward, looking at what needs to be done 🙂 A belated happy 4th July! (That spread looks delicious!)

  5. I’m a bit late … but hope you all enjoyed your lovely meal together on 4th July. Looked lovely..👌 What a good idea to salute the younger generation… my daughter tries very hard to help make a better world for her little daughter … and knows it is not an easy road ahead.

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