Spring, Glorious Spring!

Yesterday, on my way to hang laundry, something loud buzzed by my ear.

My first thought: What’s that?

My second immediate thought: The hummingbirds are back!

Lickety-split, I went into the house and set a pot of sugar water to boil. Clif went down cellar to retrieve the hummingbird feeders, and by afternoon, they were out and ready for the little winged visitors.

Later that day, as Clif and I were having drinks on the patio, a male hummingbird came for a sip of the sugar water in the feeders. Readers, as the season progresses and more hummingbirds come, I will try to get a shot of these whizzing beauties. But between the birds’ speed and the limitations of my wee camera, my chances of success are not good. But I will make a valiant attempt.

Around the yard, there are more signs of Spring, glorious Spring.

The ferns continue to unfurl.

The sweet red maple blossoms are falling, to be replaced by a tender fringe of new leaves.

Slowly, I have begun removing leaves from the beds in the front yard, and although there are no flowers yet, it looks pretty darned good to me. No snow, no muck. Lots of glorious green.

Finally, here is a picture of Clif at the gate.

He is happy that, at last, spring is here.

And so am I.

48 thoughts on “Spring, Glorious Spring!”

  1. Things are getting lively! I see you have some irises next to those ferns. They will be pretty in a few weeks!

  2. Hip Hip Hurray! What a delight it is to see your garden green and beaming in the sunshine.
    You have hummingbirds! Wow – magical – I had one hover near my ear once as I was meditating on a rock near Nederland, Colorado – one of the high points of my life!
    I might have told you before, I’ll probably tell you each and every spring!!! 😀 😀

  3. I’ll be impressed if you manage to get a good shot of the hummingbirds. We don’t have them here but we do have a good substitute – hummingbird moths. I haven’t managed to get a good photo of one of those yet but I’ll try again this year.
    Clif looks much more relaxed leaning against the garden gate than holding up a snow measuring stick.

    1. Believe it or not, every once in a while, I get a good shot of a hummingbird. Yes, Clif is more relaxed. Of course, another chore awaits him. Raking all the sand that the town truck threw on our lawn this winter. Never a dull moment on Narrows Pond Road.

    1. I know! But in northern New England, spring and early summer are often rainy. It’s been that way for a long time. I remember my father complaining in June about how the beans he planted had rotted and had to be replanted. This would have been in the late 1960s or early 1970s.

  4. How wonderful that you have hummingbird visitors to your garden, and that you hang washing on an outdoor line. It’s my favourite housekeeping activity… I get distracted by birds, bees, what might be growing… and weeds, so sometimes it takes a while before I get back inside to whatever else I was meant to be doing.

  5. Reblogged this on Flowery Prose and commented:
    Spring is my favourite time of year! Over the next week or so, around my own posts, I’d like to showcase a few bloggers who are also celebrating the season! (This may also introduce you to some new blogs that you might enjoy as much as I do). Have fun!

  6. I saw you featured at Flowery Prose and finally got myself here to learn more about you. Now that I know you’re in Maine, I’ve got a better context for comments you’ve left at blogs like Jason’s. I love peeks into other parts of the country, and you’re clearly offering a nice one here!

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