The Two Faces of the Narrows

IMG_7742I live about a quarter of a mile from the Upper and Lower Narrows Pond. I have lived here for thirty years, and I have never been able to figure out why they are called ponds. The catchment area is 8.5 square miles, and the water is 106 feet at its deepest.

It seems I am not the only one who thinks these bodies of water are too deep and too large to be considered ponds. There is a description of the Narrows Pond in Wikipedia, and it is so charmingly written that I can’t resist sharing the entire paragraph: “Narrows Pond is actually two small twin lakes in Winthrop, Maine. They are Upper and Lower Narrows Pond, and are divided by a very narrow isthmus, hence the name. The isthmus is traversed by Narrows Pond Road, and a culvert connects the two lakes. People in canoes or kayaks can travel between the two lakes, though only by ducking first.”

Most days, the dog and I walk to the Narrows, either by road or through the woods. Right now the snow is too deep in the woods, and as I don’t have snowshoes, I must stick to the road. In a way, I don’t mind because the prospect from the isthmus is so pleasing and photogenic that it’s hard to get a bad shot.

Yesterday, when Liam and I went to the Narrows, it was though I was looking at two entities with completely different personalities. The sky over the Upper Narrows was blue, which made everything bright and cheerful.

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The Sunny Upper Narrows

On the other hand, the sky over the Lower Narrows was gray, which gave it a frowning, moody look. The Upper and Lower Narrows reminded me of two siblings who are complete opposites, as siblings often are, yet each with a special beauty.

The Moody Lower Narrows
The Moody Lower Narrows

I know, I know. One should not anthropomorphize nature, but this seems to be a weakness of mine. While I respect science and facts, my mind tends toward flights of fancy. Fortunately, I do know the difference between fact and fancy and seldom, if ever, confuse them.

And as long as I am able to tell the two apart, I will not feel guilty about letting my mind take whatever fanciful flight it wants.

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4 thoughts on “The Two Faces of the Narrows”

  1. I’m guilty of that too. But why not anthropomorphize nature? It not only helps us describe it, but it’s a good way to remind ourselves of our connections to it.

    It looks cold there. Feels like Maine here today. I’m ready for Virginia to return. πŸ™‚

    1. Hear, hear, Bill! And how deeply connected—entwined, even—we are.

      It is cold here. When the temperature hits 30 degrees, it feels balmy. I’m ready for Virginia to return, too πŸ˜‰

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